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Migrants in Melbourne Australian Migrants Since October 1945, more than 7.5 million people have migrated to Australia  - over 800 000 of these people arrived under the Humanitarian Programme. Australia's population has increased from about seven million in October 1945 to 23.03 million as at March 2013. The Migration Programme began at the end of World War II. Australia reached agreements with Britain, some European countries and with the International Refugee Organization to encourage migration—including displaced people from war-torn Europe. Today, one in four of Australia's 23 million people were born outside Australia. Since July 2009, New Zealand has been the major source country for settlers. The number of settlers arriving in Australia between July 2012 and June 2013 totalled 152 414. They came from more than 200 countries. Most were born in one of the following four countries: New Zealand (17.7 percent) India (12.1 per cent)  China (11.8 per cent) United Kingdom (7.7 per cent). Migrants in Melbourne Every year tens of thousands of new migrants make Melbourne their new home. It is natural for people to prefer to live in an area where there are familiar faces, familiar language and familiar culture. The saying “birds of the same feather flock together” seems to apply to where new migrants choose to live when they first came to Melbourne. They settled in pockets, preferring to stay close together, finding comfort in familiar faces. This clustering of migrants from particular countries is evident throughout Melbourne. New Zealanders appear to favour bayside suburbs, including Port Melbourne, Williamstown, Brighton, Elwood and St Kilda, while South Africans prefer Caulfield North, Caulfield South and Brighton East. Dandenong South has a relatively large population of Afghani-born migrants. The dominant nationality in Carlton is now Chinese, with 10 per cent of residents having been born in China. Nine per cent of residents in Carlton were born in Malaysia, while 4 per cent hail from Singapore. That could be explained by Carlton's population of international students – a third of the suburb's residents were international students at the time of the 2011 census, due to its proximity to the University of Melbourne and RMIT University. Now Greek-born migrants are most prominently found in Clarinda, Hughesdale, Clayton South, Oakleigh, and Oakleigh South, all of which are located in the city's south-east. Vietnamese migrants largely occupy Melbourne's west: Footscray, Maidstone, Maribyrnong, Braybrook, Sunshine North, Sunshine West, St Albans, Albanvale  and Deer Park. However, there is also a pocket of Vietnamese migrants in the city's south-east, in the suburbs of Springvale and Keysborough. One in every five residents of Springvale (22 per cent) and Springvale South (19 per cent) in 2011 was born in Vietnam, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics. In Springvale South, one in eight residents were born in Cambodia. Meanwhile, Chinese migrants dominate the east: Doncaster (11 per cent), Box Hill (20 per cent), Clayton (17 per cent). UK-born migrants are most concentrated along the Mornington Peninsula. In Bangholme, one in five residents was born in the UK. Sri Lankan migrants have settled largely in Melbourne's south-east, including Dandenong North, Rowville, Lysterfield, Noble Park and Endeavour Hills, but there is also a pocket in the city's north in Yuroke, near Sunbury. Melbourne's Indian belt stretches south-east from Noble Park to Cranbourne East. Yet, on the opposite side of the bay, Indian migrants have settled in Wyndham Vale, Werribee, Point Cook and Laverton. They have also settled in small pockets in Essendon, Epping, Heidelberg, Glenroy and Albion. You’ll find Iraqis in Roxburgh Park, Colaroo, Broadmeadows and Campbellfield, whilst Turkish people tend to cluster in Dallas and Meadow Heights.  

Servicing ALL suburbs within Metropolitan Melbourne

A bit about Melbourne  - Melbourne’s Buildings  - Study in Melbourne  - Melbourne’s Weather  - Melbourne’s Economy
Property Information  - Building Construction  - Highest & Best Use  - Project Feasibility  - GST & Property  - Title, Encumbrances, etc.  - Due Diligence
Live-Work-Invest - Migrants in Melbourne - Investing in Melbourne
Resources - Rates & Taxes - Stamp Duty